Celebrating Designs from Around the World — Indonesian, Danish & English Interiors


Interior design styles are characteristic of every region and culture. From East to West and North to South, you’ll find more design styles than you’ll know what to do with! As a part of this series, we’re celebrating cultural diversity by decoding design styles particular to different parts of the world. Today, we’ll be touching on three further styles — Indonesian, Danish, and English. Keep reading to learn more!

Interior design styles are characteristic of every region and culture. From East to West and North to South, you’ll find more design styles than you’ll know what to do with! As a part of this series, we’re celebrating cultural diversity by decoding design styles particular to different parts of the world. Today, we’ll be touching on three further styles — Indonesian, Danish, and English. Keep reading to learn more!


Indonesian Interior Design


Being calm and well-organised, Indonesian interior design features a casual and relaxed look. Everything has its designated place in decor, and the colour palette is usually toned down to light hues. Strong tones that imitate the flowers of Indonesia’s province of Bali, such as fuchsia, orange, and yellow, are entertained as pops of colour.


The building materials used are generally simple and natural, such as bamboo and teakwood. Rattan is also widely found in Indonesian interiors. Being a versatile material, it is used for furniture, mats, and even cabinetry.


Being calm and well-organised, Indonesian interior design features a casual and relaxed look. Everything has its designated place in decor, and the colour palette is usually toned down to light hues. Strong tones that imitate the flowers of Indonesia’s province of Bali, such as fuchsia, orange, and yellow, are entertained as pops of colour.  The building materials used are generally simple and natural, such as bamboo and teakwood. Rattan is also widely found in Indonesian interiors. Being a versatile material, it is used for furniture, mats, and even cabinetry.

Credit: Karma Group


Open spaces are famous in Indonesian interiors. Large family rooms are incorporated to allow loved ones to gather together and are often amalgamated with the dining area. Slightly smaller guest rooms are also common.


Open spaces are famous in Indonesian interiors. Large family rooms are incorporated to allow loved ones to gather together and are often amalgamated with the dining area. Slightly smaller guest rooms are also common.

Credit: Boca Da Lobo(Photographer: Melanie Tanusetiawan)


Handcrafted art rich in culture helps retain the traditional touch, whilst the simplicity and transparency lend the design to a contemporary look. Wood carvings are particularly famous in Indonesian homes.


Handcrafted art rich in culture helps retain the traditional touch, whilst the simplicity and transparency lend the design to a contemporary look. Wood carvings are particularly famous in Indonesian homes.

Credit: Modern Chandeliers


Danish Interior Design


Admired for its timelessness, elegance, and minimalism, the Danish interior design style stands out amongst others. It has a very structured — almost architectural — vibe, and features clean lines, understated furniture, and cosy accents.


The colour palette is strictly neutral and largely monochromatic, with white walls taking the prize. Interest and style, as well as pops of colour, are welcomed through strong accessories, such as lamps and throw pillows. The windows are largely kept bare. The window treatments, if any, are very sleek and minimal, allowing plenty of natural light to illuminate the space.


Admired for its timelessness, elegance, and minimalism, the Danish interior design style stands out amongst others. It has a very structured — almost architectural — vibe, and features clean lines, understated furniture, and cosy accents.  The colour palette is strictly neutral and largely monochromatic, with white walls taking the prize. Interest and style, as well as pops of colour, are welcomed through strong accessories, such as lamps and throw pillows. The windows are largely kept bare. The window treatments, if any, are very sleek and minimal, allowing plenty of natural light to illuminate the space.

Credit: Argos


Classic stripes or lines can be found in the interior. These are complemented with timeless and minimalist Danish furniture designed with proportion and balance. Functionality is always prioritised, whilst comfort and aesthetics follow along.


Classic stripes or lines can be found in the interior. These are complemented with timeless and minimalist Danish furniture designed with proportion and balance. Functionality is always prioritised, whilst comfort and aesthetics follow along.

Credit: Dwell


Cushions are mixed and matched on sofas, and rugs are laid on the floor to add texture (and the associated feeling of warmth) to the otherwise cold interior. The cushions used are made from different materials, such as velvet for the winter and linens for the summer.


Danish interiors don’t pay attention to the amount of available space. Instead, the focus is on the utilisation of space. This means creating cosy corners for reading and gathering places for family and friends.


Cushions are mixed and matched on sofas, and rugs are laid on the floor to add texture (and the associated feeling of warmth) to the otherwise cold interior. The cushions used are made from different materials, such as velvet for the winter and linens for the summer.  Danish interiors don’t pay attention to the amount of available space. Instead, the focus is on the utilisation of space. This means creating cosy corners for reading and gathering places for family and friends.

Credit: Wallpaper


Accessories that are easy to switch up as the seasons change are commonly found. Flowers help add a breath of freshness in spring, whilst scented candles help make the ambiance cosy on chilly fall nights — amidst other fun ways to incorporate the vibe of fall into your home.


Scandinavian and Danish interiors have much resemblance, but there’s a fine line between the two. While Danish interior design borrows plenty of elements from the Scandi Style, it complements them with its own unique features, too. For example, it has a slightly industrial feel to it, and places more focus on practicality and functionality.


English Interior Design


The English interior design style, also commonly termed as the British style, is big on elegance and luxury. It features the fullness of wood and textile, large windows and grand doors, cosy carpets and dignified fireplaces.


The colour palette is a mix of neutrals punctuated by pinks, greens, yellows, and blues; much of it draws inspiration from nature. Plenty of florals can be found in English interiors — from the upholstery to the walls, every element is an excuse to bring in the natural touch of flowers.